Pahoehoe Lava in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument

So what is Pahoehoe lava doing in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument?

Pahoehoe lavaPahoehoe is the second most abundant type of lava flow. Pahoehoe lava is characterized by a smooth, billowy, or ropy surface. Pahoehoe flows tend to be relatively thin, from a few inches to a few feet thick.

Pahoehoe lavaThe geologic landscape along the Rio Grande from Colorado border to Sante Fe is predominantly volcanic.  At least 35 volcanic vents have been identified on the Taos Plateau, in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.

Pahoehoe lavaPahoehoe lava is a type of basaltic lava which forms by many small breakouts of lava from an over-crusted inflating flat, irregular flow. It is typical for shield volcanoes like the ones found on the West side of the Rio Grande river.

Pahoehoe lavaThese images of Pahoehoe lava were captured while I hiked East from the Rio Grande river, up a large drainage in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.

Pahoehoe lavaThere appears to be a crystal of some nature in the rock, which I have yet to identify. If you can help, please chime in. My feet are in the image for scale.

(click on images to enlarge)

visit ~ Britt Runyon Artist Website to purchase images

Posted in New Mexico, Rio Grande del Norte National Monument | Leave a comment

Springtime Birds of Ojo Caliente

Springtime Birds of Ojo Caliente, New Mexico.

Some of the friendly feeders that visited us at our OJOHOME brought with them a splash of color. The birds I was able to capture images of included the Black-headed Grosbeak, Broad-tailed Humming Bird, Juniper Titmouse and various Finches.

For purchasing images click Britt Runyon Photography.

(click on image to enlarge)

Black-headed Grosbeak ~ At our feeders the flashy black, white, and cinnamon males and the less flamboyant females effortlessly shuck sunflower seeds with their heavy bills.

Black-headed Grossbeak at the feeder. New MexicoBlack-headed Grossbeak of New Mexico. New Mexico.Broad-tailed Humming Bird ~ Upon reading about this beauty, I discovered it possesses behavioral adaptations to survive cold nights, including the ability to enter torpor, slowing its heart rate and dropping its body temperature.

broad-tailed humming birdBroad-Tailed Humming Bird

broad tailed hummer

Juniper Titmouse ~ The American Ornithologists’ Union split the plain titmouse into the oak titmouse and the juniper titmouse in 1996, due to distinct differences in song, preferred habitat, and genetic makeup.

Juniper Titmouse of Ojo Caliente. New Mexico.Titmouse in the house.  Ojo Caliente birds.Juniper Titmouse of New Mexico.  Ojo Caliente birds.American Goldfinch ~ This female is identifiable by the conical bill; pointed, notched tail. They love seed socks.

A feeding Finch in New Mexico. Ojo Caliente.

Posted in Birds, New Mexico, New Mexico Wildlife | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Taos Celebrates Dennis Hopper Day

The Taos Pueblo, the city of Taos and Taos county celebrated Dennis Hopper Day. We gathered in the Ranchos de Taos Plaza, behind the historic San Francisco de Asís Church near the old El Cortez Theater where Hopper lived at one point. The 49-mile ride started at 1 p.m. We traveled south to Pilar, with the planned route going through the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument, up to the West Rim Road, right on 64, crossing the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge and continuing to the Taos Pueblo for greeting from Pueblo Governor Romero. Finishing off with a ride to the Taos Plaza which had been closed for this event. The entire ride was with police escort of course, as can be seen in image #2.

(click on image to enlarge and view in gallery)

Start_2117MySpi (1)The city of Taos memorialized Hopper in its civic records with the unveiling of a Dennis Hopper Street designation and sign.

RearView_2193MySpiWe crossed the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge.

Bridge_2209LiSpi Taos Pueblo Gov. Clyde M. Romero, issued a statement saying, “We, the Red Willow People of the Taos Valley, recognize May 17, 2014, as Dennis Hopper Day. Our forefathers let Dennis shoot his film, ‘Easy Rider,’ in 1968 and he became friends with our Elders and People of the Pueblo. On May 17th, we will recognize Dennis Hopper Day annually.”

GovernorRomero_2263LiSpiPossibly the first time an “airhead” (my bike, a 1992 R 100 GS) was ever allowed inside the Taos Pueblo.

TaosPeublo_2237MySpiCompleting the ride on the Taos Plaza.

Plaza_2330LiSpiThen of course music on the plaza by “The Damn Band”.

Band_2356LiSpi

To celebrate the legacy of Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider,” motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada have traveled to northern New Mexico. They’re gathering Saturday, May 17, 2014 in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza at Ranchos de Taos to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event, Dennis Hopper Day. Saturday would have been the late actor’s 78th birthday.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99vv

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

Posted in Adventure Riding, Motorcycle, New Mexico | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Mother’s Day Rio Grande Whitewater Festival 2014

The Mother’s Day Rio Grande Whitewater Festival was founded in the 1950’s by Los Alamos paddle boater Jim “Stretch” Fretwell.  After competing at Colorado’s FiBark on the Arkansas River for many years, Stretch started a whitewater race closer to home on the Rio Grande in Taos County near the town of Pilar, now known as the Pilar Racecourse.

The River Rendezvous on Friday with keynote topic of stream flow outlook for Colorado and New Mexico, by Rolf Schmidt-Petersen (NM) and Patric McDermitt (CO). Dagmar Llewellyn addressed the group concerning climate change and it’s impacts on the water resources in the Upper Rio Grande Basin. John Bailey, representing the BLM, and now newly appointed to manage the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument spoke of it’s management plan. Then came the fun and prizes with the Thowbag Competition followed by a most delicious lunch provided by the Pilar Yatch Club Cafe. Lunch was followed with a float down the Pilar Racecourse with celebrated author and boater Paul Bauer. His book, The Rio Grande: A River Guide to the Geology and Landscapes of Northern New Mexico is a must for those celebrating life in the outdoors of Northern New Mexico.

Featured festival events on Saturday and Sunday included: Slalom for kayak, canoe and Stand Up Paddle Board (SUP); the Kayak Rodeo; SUP, raft, canoe and kayak downriver races; Mom and Child downriver race; National Migratory Bird Day at the Rio Grande Gorge Visitor Center: Dutch Oven Cook-off: Open mic-campfire tunes; Kayak Clinic and demos; Interpretive guided hike in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument with a BLM Ranger; Mother’s Day Benefit Breakfast for New Mexico River Outfitters Association at the Pilar Cafe and finishing the 3 days with a  Race Awards and Party at the Blue Heron Brewery.

If you would like enlarged prints of any images from the festival, you can contact me at brittrunyon@gmail.com.

Don’t miss the next Mother’s Day Rio Grande Whitewater Festival 2015.

(click on image to enlarge with description)

JohnBailey_0108_DSC0131KayakStart_0364AnimasAmazons_1178

1stPlace_1143

Josh.2ndPlace_1475SUPmother-child_1010 (1)Kayaker_1707Josh_1597

Posted in New Mexico, Rio Grande River Project, White Water | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What’s All This Then?

“What’s all this then?” That’s a line I frequently used many years ago which I borrowed from Monty Python. It was simply to demonstrate my state of bewilderment.

So why the confusion now?

Bud Light Trash. For the past year I have been creating images of the Anheuser-Bush product that I encounter along the roads, in the back country and in our streams and rivers of North Central New Mexico, more specifically in Taos and Rio Arriba Counties. It’s everywhere. If your eyes are open, you can’t miss it. If you don’t see it, it’s because you’ve conditioned your brain not to acknowledge it, either voluntarily or otherwise.

So why do they litter?

Now I’ve come to the conclusion that all humans who litter, and especially those who litter Bud Light……..ARE IDIOTS. My knee jerk reaction is to label these Neanderthals as “stupid, selfish, thoughtless imbeciles”.

Here’s my top 3 reasons people litter Bud Light (specifically) in our beautiful state of New Mexico.

  1. It’s rebellious and anti-authoritarian to litter.
  2. They are too lazy to dispose of it properly.
  3. They have no sense of pride.

Just saying.

(click on images to enlarge)

Budlight_3424VibImage of a BL bottle taken though 12 inches of water in the main acequia of the Embudo River, Dixon.

Bud_8175VibBack country, four-wheel drive road, Bureau of Land Management land, Velarde.

Reflective_6558My reflection in the glass, Chama River Road #161.

BudLight_3796Who would toss a can here?

Budlight_3797The Taos Plateau, Rio Grande del Norte National Monument, Taos.

Bud_9199De3Wild and Scenic Section of the Rio Grande river.

Budlight_9580sHDRState Road 570, Pilar.

Budlight_9686A crushed abstract, Forest Service Road 557, Carson National Forest, Carson.

Budlight_9925ODS.SpiChama River Valley, Chamita.

Bud_1341Forest Road 76, Rito la Presa

Abiquiu_6489 - Version 2A frozen Abiquiu Lake, with Pedernal in the background, Abiquiu.

If you’ve gotten this far in my post then you surely have a opinion. What’s your thoughts?  Share this. Thanks for stopping in.

Posted in New Mexico | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

It’s a Roofing Thing

So much of my time with a camera is spent attempting to find unusual views of ordinary objects. On this day it was roofing.

propanelFor these I was inspecting the roof of a house we were contemplating purchasing.

propanelYes, we took the plunge made the purchase.

propanelWe have now taken up residence in Ojo Caliente.

Thanks for looking and please leave a comment.

Posted in Abstract | Leave a comment

The King of (not a) Color

The king of  (not a) color hands down is………..

Black is associated with power, elegance, formality, death, evil, and mystery.

Black is a mysterious color associated with fear and the unknown (black holes). It usually has a negative connotation (blacklist, black humor, ‘black death’). Black denotes strength and authority; it is considered to be a very formal, elegant, and prestigious color (black tie, black Mercedes). In heraldry, black is the symbol of grief.

But wait, black is the absence of all color and the absence of light. Black hides, while white brings to light. What black covers, white uncovers.

So what about black and white?

(click on images to enlarge)

El Tigre, Antigua, Guatemala, Central America.

El Tigre_3586

In this image of the Snow Raven, black brings the detail and white looses detail.

Snow Raven

In this Hoarfrost image the detail is clearly presented by the white.

HoarfrostCompared to colorful designs where catchy colors help the image to stand out, in black-and-white designs the ability to stand out depends only on its ability to communicate rather than on its appealing visual presentation.

Bill

Beautiful black and white photography doesn’t attract with its play of colors. Close attention to composition, lighting, perspective and the context it is shot in are important.

Gorge BridgeSo the bottom line is, black is the absence of color (and is therefore not a color).

Secret AgentWhite is the blending of all colors and is a color.

Jo IceSo combining the two in a well planned batch of digital gigibyts is what makes a good image.

OK, enough already! Here’s some images utilizing one color and one “not” a color.

_________________

Christmas Tree Cave, Grand Canyon National Park.

Tree CaveBald Eagle in flight. Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.

Bald EagleSnow Fish, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Snow FishSUP, Paddle Boarder, Panama, Central America.

Paddle Boarder Bighorn Sheep, Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.

Young RamBoulder Snow, Rio Grande river, New Mexico.

Boulder SnowHonduran Dock, West End, Honduras, Central America.

Honduran DockTalley View, Big Bend National Park, Texas.

Talley ViewCan Tops (in water)

Can Tops

(click on images to enlarge)

Thanks for dropping in. Please leave a comment so I know you were here.

Posted in Black and White, No Rules Digital Images | Leave a comment

Popular Image of the Week

The most popular image of the week, I’ll be short and to the point, is Coyote in the Bush…..

Sell Art Online

Number two has to be and is my favorite……..

Peekaboo Bighorn

Art Prints

Click on the image for a larger view on Fine Art America.

Thanks for stopping in.

 

Posted in Travels | Leave a comment

Water Abstractions

Spending a lot of my outdoor time along our nations rivers in search of water abstractions, I always get my feet wet. It seems to happen as I move along the shore line with my gaze on the water and neglecting to pay attention to the placement of my feet. Sometimes it’s merely a glance, other times I stand transfixed in a trance, unmoving, unable to remove my fixation from the water’s appearance. But hey, sometimes it’s worth it!

(click on large image to view in full screen)

(click on small image to view purchase information)

The Island Gold image was taken on an early morning Autumn outing in search of fall colors. Upon leaving the house, in Dixon, New Mexico, the plan was to photograph the golden leaves of the Rio Grande’s cottonwood trees but as often happens, plans change and the gold color of the water’s surface took hold.

Island Gold_7339De3.SNF

Photography Prints

Aslant Blue is one of my personal favorites. A clear day, riverside vegetation and a perfect sun angle in New Mexico’s Rio Grande del Norte National Monument presented me with this marvel, almost a hallucination. Some have compared it with a Monet painting.

Aslant Blue_3526Buz

Photography Prints

Summer Water Reflection was taken while I explored the first major tributary of the Rio Grande, the Rio Chama Wild and Scenic river. The topography of the river bed lay out in such a way that a small “v wave” formed facing the left shore where I was standing.

Summer Water_6540

Art Prints

Duck Trails could have been named duck wake or duck slipstream or duck backwash or duck wash or perhaps duck path. I like trails better. It’s a added bonus when the  water’s surface is throwing back it’s reflective colors and wildlife enters the scene.

DuckTrails_2925De3.SNF

Photography Prints

Flora Reflection is a winter image. Usually my winter time photographic jaunts are in search of wildlife, in particular the Bald Eagles that frequent the Rio Grande when the seasonal temperatures drop, but when sightings are infrequent, the water speaks. Seen here is the native flora in it’s winter color being mirrored on the water.

FloraReflection_7710De3.SN

Photography Prints

Thank you so much for looking in. Feel free and encouraged to leave your comments below (even if it’s just to point out a typo).

Posted in Abstract, Water | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New Mexico Bighorn Sheep

New Mexico Bighorn Sheep can easily be found just minutes away from my front door. As often as I can, I head up into the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument in search of images. I don’t really have a plan, I just go and observe. It was on a warm, sunny, January day that I happened upon, “The Boss”.

In 2007 crews with the state Department of Game and Fish, the U.S. Forest Service and Taos Pueblo used drop nets baited with salt blocks to capture 25 sheep in the Pecos Wilderness. The animals were examined, given shots, outfitted with radio collars and trucked to the release site along the Rio Grande Gorge just south of Taos.

Now seven years later one finds it rare to see a sheep with a collar. I wonder, was “The Boss” trucked in or did he get wind of “friends” in The Gorge, scamper down for a short visit but after checking out the scene, stayed?

(click on images to enlarge and scroll through gallery)

TheBoss_8783sHDRThe Boss.

TheBoss_8751sHDRA gathering of male Bighorn Sheep is aptly called a “bachelor group”.

TheBoss_8774Most of the time he browsed, undeterred by my presence.

TheBoss_8777sHDR…..but even when facing away, he had his eye on me.

TheBoss_8788sHDRHis muzzle displayed the scar of resent clashes.

TheBoss_8792sHDRTheir sure-footedness is amazing.

TheBoss_8748sHDR

Note the swollen/damaged muzzle.

These images were taken on January 22, 2013 in the vicinity of Taos Junction Bridge. Thanks for stopping in. Please leave your comment.

 

Posted in New Mexico Wildlife, Rio Grande Bighorn Sheep | Leave a comment