Taos Celebrates Dennis Hopper Day

The Taos Pueblo, the city of Taos and Taos county celebrated Dennis Hopper Day. We gathered in the Ranchos de Taos Plaza, behind the historic San Francisco de Asís Church near the old El Cortez Theater where Hopper lived at one point. The 49-mile ride started at 1 p.m. We traveled south to Pilar, with the planned route going through the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument, up to the West Rim Road, right on 64, crossing the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge and continuing to the Taos Pueblo for greeting from Pueblo Governor Romero. Finishing off with a ride to the Taos Plaza which had been closed for this event. The entire ride was with police escort of course, as can be seen in image #2.

(click on image to enlarge and view in gallery)

Start_2117MySpi (1)The city of Taos memorialized Hopper in its civic records with the unveiling of a Dennis Hopper Street designation and sign.

RearView_2193MySpiWe crossed the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge.

Bridge_2209LiSpi Taos Pueblo Gov. Clyde M. Romero, issued a statement saying, “We, the Red Willow People of the Taos Valley, recognize May 17, 2014, as Dennis Hopper Day. Our forefathers let Dennis shoot his film, ‘Easy Rider,’ in 1968 and he became friends with our Elders and People of the Pueblo. On May 17th, we will recognize Dennis Hopper Day annually.”

GovernorRomero_2263LiSpiPossibly the first time an “airhead” (my bike, a 1992 R 100 GS) was ever allowed inside the Taos Pueblo.

TaosPeublo_2237MySpiCompleting the ride on the Taos Plaza.

Plaza_2330LiSpiThen of course music on the plaza by “The Damn Band”.

Band_2356LiSpi

To celebrate the legacy of Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider,” motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada have traveled to northern New Mexico. They’re gathering Saturday, May 17, 2014 in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza at Ranchos de Taos to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event, Dennis Hopper Day. Saturday would have been the late actor’s 78th birthday.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99vv

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Motorcyclists and movie fanatics from as far away as Canada made the pilgrimage to northern New Mexico to celebrate Dennis Hopper and his iconic counterculture film “Easy Rider.”

Several dozen motorcycles gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe encircled plaza in the community of Ranchos de Taos, 4 miles south of Taos, to kick off what town officials hope will be an annual event – Dennis Hopper Day – with a rally and ride through some of the places made famous in the film.

Motorcyclists pulled out of the plaza just before 1 p.m. MDT. Led by a police escort, they started their easy ride on the two-lane road heading out of Taos, a diverse town known for skiing, art and Hispanic and Native American culture. Not unlike scenes in the movie, snow-capped mountains served as a classic backdrop for much of the ride.

Saturday would have been the late actor and director’s 78th birthday. Hopper lived in Taos for years and is buried here.

Town Manager Rick Bellis says the day is aimed at recognizing Hopper’s contributions as a resident, a filmmaker, a supporter of the arts and for simply being a “colorful member” of the community.

“His image really represents the spirit of Taos,” Bellis said. “He was independent, slightly eccentric but incredibly talented. He sort of became a symbol for a whole new generation.”

Hopper first came to New Mexico in the late 1960s to scout locations for “Easy Rider.” Shot on a shoestring budget, the independent film summed up the hopes and anxieties of the ’60s, romanticized the open road and ended up revolutionizing Hollywood by forcing the studio gates to open to a new generation of film school graduates.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20140517_ap_bd16e6e3bae64e2b9ed7d0e75f8b7a07.html#q0qRMC0QwK3QkmLJ.99

About Britt Runyon

A New Mexico based free roaming outdoor digital photographer, always on the qui vive for what Nature and humans provide.
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